Sheep to Shawl

Soft as a pillow.

Frontier Homestead State Park invites you to our first big event of 2017. Join us Saturday, March 18 for a trip back in time as we explore wool, from Sheep to Shawl. Frontier Homestead State park in partnership with the Sagebrush Fiber Artisans will allow participants to journey through the step-by-step process of taking wool from the sheep’s back to yours. Join us from 10:00-2:00 to have fun with the whole family.

Sheep will be attending as well to give visitors the opportunity to touch and feel before and after their annual haircut. Shearing demonstrations will be given hourly starting and 10:30am and run until 1:30pm.

Spot before her haircut.

 

 

Spot during her haircut.

Dyeing wool

Demonstrations include shearing, washing, carding, spinning and dyeing wool. Knitting and weaving will be available to participate in. Come enjoy the activities and visit with our talented craftspeople. Cost is $2.00 per person or $5.00 per family. Friend’s Group members are free with membership card.

 

Spinners at the walking wheel

This living history experience is hosted at the Frontier Homestead State Park Museum located at 635 North Main Street in Cedar City. Call 435-586-9290 for more information.

Christmas at the Homestead

spinners-tree-2Are you looking for a fun, family friendly, affordable way to celebrate the Christmas season? How about Christmas at the Homestead—the Frontier Homestead State Park Museum, that is! The Utah Shakespeare Festival and the popular state park in Cedar City are once again partnering to provide a Christmas celebration for area residents and visitors.

First up is the second annual Homestead Christmas Market December 2 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and December 3, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Recapturing the sights, sounds, smells and ambiance of a pioneer Christmas market, this event provides a truly unique holiday shopping experience; where you can browse and buy from over 50 artists and craftsmen. It’s a great opportunity to find that perfectly handcrafted gift for the special someone on everyone’s list.

Admission to the event is just $1 per person. Free hot chocolate will be available both days, and holiday music will be featured on December 3. For more information, visit christmasatthehomestead.com.

The annual Christmas at the Homestead will be December 5 to 9 from 5:30 to 8 p.m. each day. The cost is only $2 per person or $5 for the entire family, and there will definitely be something for everyone—young, old, and in between.

homestead-christmas-4“Nothing will get you in the holiday spirit quicker and more completely than spending an evening at Christmas at the Homestead,” said Todd Prince, Frontier Homestead State Park Manager. “It’s an enchanting experience with everything that makes Christmas special: music, friends and family, entertainment, and holiday goodies.”

All the museum’s regular features and exhibits will be open each night. In addition, different entertainment will be featured each evening, including music and dance at 6 and 7 each evening and Christmas story readings at 6:30 and 7:30. 

Walking through the various museum structures, visitors will get a feeling of yesteryear. Each will be decorated with a themed tree and other decorations. Some of the trees will be favorites from previous years, but a few new ones will also make their premieres. Ben Hohman, properties director for the Festival, has designed the lighting in the park.

Of course, Santa will be in the Hunter House each evening from 5:30 to 8. Each night will also include different treats: popcorn, baked goods, and hot chocolate. As you walk among the various buildings, 15 unique themed trees might give you some inspiration for your home. Each evening will also include different hands-on activities: beaded ornaments, Christmas cord, dipping candles, etc.

“This is a great opportunity for individuals and families to benefit from an affordable and entertaining holiday experience,” said Joshua Stavros, Festival media and public relations manager.“Christmas at the Homestead gives us a chance to celebrate our rich heritage and give something back to the community.”

For the latest information and details, visit: www.christmasatthehomestead.com. christmas-at-the-homestead-2016-poster

Iron Mission Days: A Cedar City Birthday Celebration

Frontier Homestead State Park Museum once again celebrates the founding of Cedar City with a day of activities designed to honor the spirit of our community and those that created opportunities for our growth. Come and enjoy the cool crisp fall air on Saturday November 5th from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm as Frontier Homestead hosts its annual Iron Mission Days. The cost is $5.00 per family.

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Enjoy tasty treats from our wood fired earth oven and cook stove.

This year the Park is excited to highlight two new features of the Homestead – the Hunter House Summer Kitchen and the Native Heritage Exhibit.  For the past two years many people have worked diligently to bring these projects to fruition.  Partnerships and support from the Cedar City RAP Tax, the Division of Utah Arts and Museums, and Southern Utah University helped make these new exhibits possible.  Todd Prince, Park Manager, said, “The addition of the summer kitchen and Native Heritage Exhibit greatly increased our capacity to offer more variety of activities to our visitors.  These will be prized for years to come.  And with the completion of the back grounds of the Hunter House, we will now be able to offer a space for group rentals such as wedding receptions and family reunions. The open house on November 5th is a wonderful opportunity for the community to experience these new exhibits first hand.”

Explore the pithouse.

Explore the pithouse.

The Summer Kitchen will be ready for a fall appearance.

The Summer Kitchen will be ready for a fall appearance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kasey Warhurst our Museum Blacksmith will be pounding iron.

Kasey Warhurst our Museum Blacksmith will be pounding iron.

Pioneer activities, crafts for kids, living history demonstrations and tours of our Native Heritage Area and Hunter House Summer Kitchen will be available. Staff will be showcasing tomahawk throwing, goodies baked in the wood-fired oven, and our Museum Blacksmith will be on hand. Additionally, visitors will be able to practice throwing the atlatl, pitching horseshoes, and of course, making the park’s well-known rag dolls.

 

Can you throw a tomahawk and make it stick?

Can you throw a tomahawk and make it stick?

Corn grinding will be available.

Corn grinding will be available.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday November 5th promises to be a fun-filled day of adventure for the whole family. Step back in time with Frontier Homestead State Park.

Check out our website for more information: frontierhomestead.org

Cedar City Livestock and Heritage Festival: A Guest Blog

This week we invited the Livestock Festival to write about one of Cedar City’s great events.

Sheep on parade

Sheep on parade

Tranquil Downtown will get a little wild and wooly on Saturday, October 29th at 10 a.m. when Cedar City’s Annual Sheep Parade herds its way down Main Street. Considered one of the most unique parades in the country, over 1,000 head of sheep will follow the historic Livestock Trail from Cedar Mountain, down Cedar City’s Main Street, to their winter home in the Cedar Valley. The Sheep Parade is the highlight event for the 11th Annual Cedar Livestock & Heritage Festival, an annual celebration of southern Utah’s agricultural traditions and lifestyle.

According to Festival Chairman, Chad Reid “The first sheep were herded from Cedar Mountain in 1870, and have continued to travel through Cedar City every year since.” Reid adds, “The sight of a herd of sheep trailing down Main Street through historic Downtown is an exciting glimpse of our livestock heritage and truly a spectacle not to be missed. You never know if the sheep are going to behave or not.”

Horses, wagons, antique tractors, stock dogs, and historic and modern sheep camps also take part in the procession. The parade route is along Main Street from 200 South to 400 North. After the parade the tractors and sheep camps are on display the remainder of the day at the Cross Hollows Events Center, located at 11 North Cross Hollows Dr., during the Cedar Livestock & Heritage Festival.

The 11th Annual Cedar Livestock & Heritage Festival celebrates Iron County’s unique livestock and agricultural heritage October 27-30th with a variety of authentic events , including; cowboy poetry, Dutch Oven cooking contest, draft horse and antique tractor pull, stock dog demo, sheep camp display, quilt show, vintage auto display, ranch rodeo and of course the Sheep Parade!

New events have been added this year to include a Junior Ranch Rodeo; where youth teams compete in the traditional ranch skills of goat milking, team roping and branding. The Junior Ranch Rodeo will take place Friday night, October 28th at 4 pm at the Cross Hollows Events Center, 11 S. Cross Hollows Road. The 2nd new event is the Sheep Lead Contest; a sort of sheep fashion show according to Reid, where “contestants not only display their fashion skills but also their sheep-handling talents”. The Sheep Lead Contest will take place Saturday, October 29th at 4 pm at the Cross Hollows Events Center.

For more information on all the Cedar Livestock &Heritage Festival activities including the Sheep Parade, visit www.cedarlivestockfest.com or call 435-586-8132

Military Appreciation Day at Frontier Homestead

veteran day copyIn an effort to honor and recognize the significant contributions of our military members, Utah State Parks announces Military Appreciation Day Saturday, August 13. Day-use entrance fees into all Utah state parks will be waived for active service members and veterans and their families. All 42 state parks will offer special activities or displays as way to pay tribute and say thank you.

 

 

Signal Flags

Signal Flags spelling “FUN”

Tent Pitching

Tent Pitching

Come celebrate our courageous military personnel with your family, friends and community at Frontier Homestead on Saturday August 13, 2016. Frontier Homestead will present a number of military themed activities for young and old alike, including firing our cannon on every half hour between 10am and 2pm. Visitors will step back in time and live life as a frontier soldier. Activities include learning close order drills, writing letters with ink and quill, learning to communicate with signal flags, pitching frontier army tents, and solving a secret code. Additionally, our wood fired oven will be in use providing era appropriate treats. Visitors will also have access to all our hands-on historical activity stations. Admission to the park is $5.00 per family or free for active service members and veterans and their families as well as Friends of the Frontier Homestead members.                                                                                     The activities will run from 10am to 2 p.m.

We will be firing the cannon

We will be firing the cannon

At our Military Appreciation Day there is sure to be something to make you think, smile, or laugh so come join us. Spend some time learning about your family by playing with your family at Frontier Homestead.

Frontier Homestead on Television

This summer, Frontier Homestead State Park has been featured on a couple of media outlets and we thought we would share them here. First, The Good For Utah Road Trip visited our park and shot a segment with Stephen Olsen, a long-time member of our staff. You can view the clip here:

FHSP Good For Utah segment

Also, Fox 13’s The Place stopped by and spoke with Museum Curator Ryan Paul. You can view that segment here:

FHSP Fox 13 The Place segment

Now that you have seen the park online, why don’t you come and visit us in person.

Frontier Folk Festival

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Frontier Folk Festival

Frontier Homestead State Park Museum and The Frontier Homestead Museum Foundation are pleased to bring the first annual Frontier Folk Festival to Cedar City, Utah, June 17-18, 11 am – 8 pm each day. The Festival will be held on the grounds of the museum located at 635 North Main Street. Admission is $1.00 per person.

Original art, live music, traditional craft demonstrations, and a horseshoe tournament combine to celebrate the diverse heritage of southern Utah.  The Frontier Folk Festival promises to be filled with remarkable talent.  Featured bands include Stillhouse Road, Wilhelm, The Red Hill Rangers, Hen Hao Fiddlers, The Sonoran Dogs, and Marty Warburton and Homegirls.

The Sonoran Dogs are one of the many groups playing the Festival.

The Sonoran Dogs are one of the many groups playing the Festival.

For horseshoe enthusiasts, the tournament will take place on Saturday, with Junior level (under 14) starting at 11:00 a.m., and Adult level (14 and up) beginning at 1:00 p.m.  Prizes will be awarded for first and second places.

“We’ve been talking about this idea for years,” says Todd Prince, Frontier Homestead Park Manager.  “Working with our Museum Foundation, we finally decided to take the leap and offer a new experience to the community and all our patrons.  It will be a great event for anyone attracted to history, the visual arts and folk music.”  Festival Coordinator, Sandi Levy, added, “The Foundation is simply thrilled to offer this family friendly experience to the community.  It is a golden opportunity for us all to experience our heritage!”

Corn broom maker Marie Jagger will be one of the many Festival vendors.

Corn broom maker Marie Jagger will be one of the many Festival vendors.

We are looking forward to a diverse, high quality experience, with all our exhibiting artists, musicians, demonstrators and food purveyors. The Frontier Folk Festival will have something for everyone and we are excited to continue the local tradition of bringing the arts in all of their forms to Cedar City, Iron County, and beyond.

For more information and to see a full list of artists, musicians, and sponsors visit frontierhomestead.org or click on the link below:

Frontier Folk Festival

Celebrate Archaeology at Frontier Homestead

A mock dig is one of the activities being presented.

A mock dig is one of the activities being presented.

Frontier Homestead State Park welcomes archaeologists young and old and their families to participate in its annual Utah Archaeology Day on Saturday, May 7, 2016. Visitors will have the opportunity to participate in activities involving Native American games, history, traditional crafts and skills, and visit with a variety of demonstrators. Boy Scouts who participate in the event can earn their Indian Lore merit badge and complete some of the Archaeology badge requirements. Archaeology Day will take place from 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Cost per person is $2.00 per person or $5.00 per family.

Archaeology Day is the kick-off for a series of activities sponsored by Frontier Homestead State Park, the Cedar City-Brian Head Tourism Bureau, Project

Traditional crafts and skills.

Traditional crafts and skills.

Archaeology, Transcon Environmental, Southern Utah University-College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Intersearch, and the Pizza Cart; and, co-sponsored by the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest Service, Home Depot, and Lin’s Fresh Market.

The celebration of Utah Archaeology and Preservation Month continues on Wednesday May 11 at 7:00 pm. Come enjoy the camaraderie of the Iron County Historical Society and meet historic archaeologist and co-owner of Transcon Environmental, Everett Bassett.  Mr. Bassett will present his recent findings pertaining to the mass graves near Mountain Meadows.  This is an exceptional and enlightening experience that is open to the public. The program will take place at Frontier Homestead State Park Museum, and is free to the public.

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Corn Grinding

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Demonstratons

On Saturday May 14, enjoy a free, guided tour of Old Iron Town, a late 19th Century iron mining town.  The tour will begin at Frontier Homestead State Park at 10 am and return by 1 pm. Sack lunches will be provided to all registered participants.  You must request a reservation and receive confirmation for this event.  Space is limited to 15 individuals.  Please email Samantha Kirkley to reserve a spot, including any dietary restrictions, samanthakirkley@suu.edu.  Please come with appropriate footwear, sunscreen, and water.  Limited carpooling to the site is available.

Next, on Monday May 16, 6:00 to 8:00 pm, the public can take advantage of a rare opportunity to see artifacts from local archaeological sites.  Archaeologist and Curator, Barbara Frank, will be offering tours every half hour of the SUU Archaeological Repository.  The Repository is located in Room 101-A, west basement door, ELC, SUU campus. Directional signs will be on the doors of the ELC to ensure that you arrive.  All ages welcome!

Finally, on Wednesday, May 25, 7:00 pm at the Cedar City Public Library, archaeologist Barbara Frank will facilitate a book discussion of A Thief of Time by Tony Hillerman. Fifteen copies of this book are available at the circulation desk. This is also a great opportunity to see the Archaeology Month display inside and take time to enjoy the Rock Art out front!

According to Samantha Kirkley, State Coordinator for Project Archaeology, “Archaeology and Historic Preservation Month, a Division of State History program, is an annual celebration of Utah’s archaeological and historic resources. With so many wonderful archaeological sites in Southern Utah, we really have something to celebrate and enjoy.  Archaeology Month offers opportunities for all ages to participate in activities that promote cultural understanding and respect, and stewardship of these special places.”

Final_Flat

Sheep to Shawl: Spinning and Weaving

Controlling the yarn

Controlling the yarn

The spinning process turns prepared fiber into yarn or thread. The spinner controls the thickness and amount of twist to give the finished yarn the desired qualities. Usually yarn is plied, multiple strands twisted together, to give the final product more strength. The yarn is stored on a spindle or bobbin as it is spun.

A spinner in action

A spinner in action

 

Once the spindle or bobbin is full the yarn is wound on to a skein winder. There are various types of skein winder, but they all perform the same purpose: they allow the length of the yarn to be determined and keep the yarn in organized, untangled loops, ready to be turned into fabric.

 

 

Weaving

Weaving

One way the yarn could be used is on a loom to weave fabric or rugs. Warp threads are those that run the length of the fabric. The warp is wound on to a beam at the back of the loom. Each strand of warp is then passed through a harness and a reed. The harness moves up and down to create the woven pattern. A simple loom will have just two harnesses which makes a plain weave. Looms with four, eight, or sixteen harnesses allow for more complicated patterns. In a floor loom, like the rug loom at the museum, the harnesses are controlled by treadles. When a treadle is stepped on a system of chains and pulleys raise one harness and lower the other. This creates a space for the shuttle containing the weft, the horizontal strands, to pass from one side to the other.

You can even weave using straws.

You can even weave using straws.

The other treadle is then pressed, causing the harnesses reversethe position of the warp, and the shuttle is passed back across the loom. Between each pass of the shuttle the reed is pulled forward to press the weft tightly in to place. As the fabric grows it is wound onto a beam at the front of the loom.

015Also, be sure to mark your calendars for our Sheep to Shawl event, This Saturday, March 19,  from 10am to 2pm. Call us at 435-586-9290 for more information.

Sheep to Shawl 2016

Join us Saturday, March 19 for a trip back in time as we explore wool, from Sheep to Shawl. Frontier Homestead State park in partnership with the Sagebrush Fiber Artisans will allow participants to journey through the step-by-step process of taking wool from the sheep’s back to yours. From 10:00-2:00 have fun with the whole family as you explore how pioneers made clothes. Sheep will be attending as well to give visitors the opportunity to touch and feel before and after their annual haircut.

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A young knitter practices his skills.

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Spinners creating yarn.

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A freshly shorn Spots.

Demonstrations include washing, carding, spinning and dyeing wool. Knitting, crocheting and weaving will be available to participate in. Come enjoy the activities and visit with our talented craftspeople. Cost is $1.50 per person or $5.00 per family. Friend’s Group members are free with membership card.