The Kolob Society visits Frontier Homestead

Frontier Homestead State Park Museum is pleased to announce a special exhibit by the Kolob Society, celebrating the National Park Service Centennial.  The public is invited to an artist’s reception on Saturday May 7, from 1:00–3:00 p.m.  Members of the Kolob Society will be painting on-site throughout the day, providing an opportunity for the public to observe the creative process and interact with the artists.

Plein Air painting

Plein Air painting

The Kolob Society is an informal group of plein air painters who meet on Thursday afternoons and Sunday mornings to go out on paint on location.  Plein Air is a French term which means “in the open air” and is used to describe painting outdoors. Members of this society enjoy being outdoors and immersed in their subject matter as they paint.

Painting winter landscapes

Painting winter landscapes

The Kolob Society was formed in June 2011 through Artisans Art Gallery, and started out with just a few members, but now numbers over 160 artists.  All artists are welcome to join the Society, using any medium.  Member artists represent all skill levels, from beginner to professional, who use a variety of mediums, including oils, watercolor, pastels, pencil, and photography.  After the paintings are completed, the group will meet to talk about them and offer critiques, suggestions, and encouragement.

Individuals interested in the Kolob Society can contact Debbie Robb via email at debbie-robb@leavitt.com.

The exhibit will continue at Frontier Homestead through June 30.

Kolob Society painting in the fall.

Kolob Society painting in the fall.

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The Utah Parks Company – Dining

Everything at the Utah Parks Company controlled lodges reflected the care which the UPC took to reward their guests. The dining room became the center of the lodge. Three times a day it was opened and closed and produced a variety of treats that matched the surroundings in every way possible – if you were a guest that is. Employees were usually fed the previous night’s dinner, but very few complained.

Menu from the Bryce Canyon Lodge - August 11, 1934

Menu from the Bryce Canyon Lodge –
August 11, 1934

Meals were chosen on a weekly basis by Company headquarters and groceries were sent every few days by delivery truck. Guests were usually given a choice between two entrees and a variety of deserts and beverages. One of the items always included on the menu was the relish tray. This large platter of olives, pickles, and various other fresh vegetables proved notoriously hard to carry. Many stories have been told of rogue olives falling down a visitor’s dress or of watching in horror as the tray crashes to the floor, spraying innocent onlookers with pickle juice.

Every care was taken to please the sensibilities of the guests. The small menus came with colorful postcards attached. Most of the UPC tours included room and board in the package price, so the dining room became a prime spot to provide stand out service. The Grand Canyon dining room featured large bay windows and the tables near them were difficult to get.

The dining room at the North Rim.

The dining room at the North Rim.

Additionally, Grand Canyon had a large organ at the dining room entrance and every evening guests would hear the Grand Canyon Suite played while they ate. For those easterners who feared the backward ways of the West, these dining experiences proved a welcome relief from the dusty trail.

Although not a traditional overnight stop on the Loop tour, the lodge at Cedar Breaks proved to have the most remembered dish – fried chicken. Every bus would stop at Cedar Breaks and partake of this wonderful treat. The chicken dinner with all the fixins’ soon became the only item on the evening menu. Some drove all the way up from Cedar City for a taste of this local delight. Those who ate at the UPC dining facilities left with crumbs on their shirts and smiles on their faces.

The UPC also offered special BBQ's outside the lodge dining rooms.

The UPC also offered special BBQ’s outside the lodge dining rooms.

UPC waitresses were expected to place cards on the table with information including where they went to school.

UPC waitresses were expected to place cards on the table with information including where they went to school.

Collections Care: Paper

Almost everyone has some sort of paper document. Whether it be newspaper clippings, art work, birth certificates, licenses, or other records, these papers come in a variety of conditions on an assortment of paper types. When paper was first being developed it was made from plant fibers and cloth, and as a result was very durable. As the production of paper evolved toward machine made types from wood it became more vulnerable to heat and moisture. Extreme temperature or humidity as well as frequent changes in temperature or humidity are harmful to paper. Because of chemicals and additives that are used in the paper making process it is also susceptible

Pests can be devastating to paper.

Pests can be devastating to paper.

to discoloration caused by contact with other chemicals. Damage can also be caused by other sources such as insects, fungi, ultraviolet light, and the oils in our skin.  Because of the many ways paper is able to be damaged it is important to know how you can avoid the damage that can occur.

One of the best and easiest ways that one can avoid damage to paper is to keep them in a climate controlled environment. Papers do best in an environment that is at a temperature no higher than 72 degrees Fahrenheit, along with a relative humidity around 50 percent. It is important that as you are storing paper that it is not placed in a damp basement, or uninsulated garage or attic where the temperature would become excessively hot during summer or too cold during the winter.

Exposure to UV light can cause severe discoloration, as seen in this i,age.

Exposure to UV light can cause severe discoloration, as seen in this image.

Another way of taking good care of your paper is to avoid touching it with bare hands. A lot of times even just the oils on a hand can discolor the paper over time. Along with avoiding touch, excessive handling can damage paper by increasing wear and the probability of tearing.

Be sure not to fold and refold your documents, as it will create weak points.

Be sure not to fold and refold your documents, as it will create weak points.

It is important to note that it is not a good idea to use tape, glue, staples, or paperclips on valuable papers. These will all cause damage over time that may make them impossible to repair. With regards to cleaning and repairs of paper it is usually better to leave those jobs to professionals that will know more about specific types of papers. If you take the proper steps in preserving your paper you will be able to enjoy it for many more years to come. If you have any questions about the care of your personal papers, please contact Frontier Homestead State Park. The conservation professionals there can be a great resource in helping you preserve your past.

Sprite and the National Parks

Pop, fountain drinks, flavored water, the possibilities for what it’s been called vary based on region and dialect; but undoubtedly everyone in the United States has heard of soda. An American staple for decades, soda is a large industry. Popular brands such as Coca-Cola and Pepsi are household names. With a recent gift of a collection of vintage soda bottles, we have discovered an advertisement that hits close to home utilizing the wide-spread popularity of the flavored drinks.

 

New bottles added to the collection. Donated by Robin Haight.

New bottles added to the collection. Donated by Robin Haight.

In 1966, operation “Golden Eagle” was introduced by the federal government. As part of this promotion of national parks and monuments a family could purchase a “golden permit” for $7 that would allow them to visit any national park as many times as they wanted between April of 1966 and March of 1967.

A 1966 Coca Cola publication.

A 1966 Coca Cola publication.

The Coca-Cola Company began an advertising promotion using the iconic green glass Sprite bottle. They produced a line of 7 to 10 ounce Sprite bottles embossed with the names of 36 national parks and monuments, ranging from the Lincoln Memorial to Yellowstone National Park. The Coca-Cola Company thought that by doing this, they not only could encourage visitors to use and enjoy America’s federal recreation areas, but create a unique collectors market. Various bottle manufactures sprang into action and began producing the new bottles. However, for reasons unknown, the promotion fell through. Instead of scrapping the bottles, the Company decided to put them into circulation in an effort to highlight the importance of the National Park system.

Zion National Park bottle.

Zion National Park bottle.

In the collection recently donated, 5 bottles have the names embossed on the bottom. These include: Mammoth Cave National Park (twice), Sequoia National Park, Big Bend National Park, and one we were very excited to find, Zion National Park. These bottles bring back fond memories and long after their contents are gone, they are still inspiring people to visit our National Parks.

 

For more about this promotion and a full list of the bottles produced, check out this article from the May 1966 issue of Coca-Cola’s own Refresher Magazine. Sprite National Park Promotion.