Cedar City: A Look Back – Welcome Sign

Tourism has been and continues to be an economic mainstay for Cedar City and Iron County. In summer of 2016, a little over one million visitors, ate, slept, shopped, and were entertained in our local area. This does not count the thousands who come during the winter to enjoy our amazing winter recreation opportunities. This Welcome sign stood on the corner of Main and Center for many years. The photo was taken in 1947. For up to date information visit the Cedar City – Brian Head Tourism Bureau at visitcedarcity.com

Featured Artist: Blaine Demille

Colorado Mines Hotel Still Life
Oil

Aside from our regularly exhibited artifact collection, Frontier Homestead State Park Museum has a rotating special exhibit gallery that is used by artists and artisans of many disciplines to showcase, highlight, and sell their work. Through May 31 we are pleased to feature the work of visual artist Clayton Blaine Demille. Exhibited works feature an extensive collection of paintings highlighting desert scenes, portraits, and various still lifes.

For over three decades, Demille has been producing personalized fine art commissions in portraits, murals, and decorative painting. His early training was grounded in traditional figure and portrait studies under the late Al Gittins at the University of Utah art department. Later, in Denver, Colorado he tutored with European painter P.A. Kontny.

The Grandfathers
Charcoal

Demille designs and creates custom wall murals, sky ceiling, and painted furniture pieces for homes and business settings. In these diverse works, Demille endeavors to bring to the painted wall a touch of old world magic – an imaginative space which transforms any architectural setting.

Demille has exhibited in Colorado, Northern California, Florida, and throughout Utah. Frontier Homestead is open Monday-Saturday, from 9am to 5pm. Don’t let the opportunity to see this amazing artistic collection pass you by. Remember, the exhibit closes June May 31.

Demille painting a mural for the Violin School of America in Salt Lake City, UT.

The completed mural can still be seen at 200 South 300 East in Salt Lake City, UT

Archaeology Day 2017

Frontier Homestead State Park welcomes archaeologists young and old and their families to participate in its annual Utah Archaeology Day on Saturday, May 6, 2017. Visitors will have the opportunity to participate in activities involving Native American games, history, traditional crafts and skills, and visit with a variety of demonstrators. Archaeology Day will take place from 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Cost per person is $2.00 per person or $5.00 per family.

Archaeology Day is the kick-off for a series of activities sponsored by Frontier Homestead State Park, Project Archaeology, Bureau of Land Management, Southern Utah University-College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Intersearch, Transcon Environmental, and the Cedar City Public Library.

Archaeology Day 1 - atlatll (1)The celebration of Utah Archaeology and Preservation Month continues on Friday May 12th and 19th at 7:00 pm with two showings of Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade at the Sharwan Smith Center on SUU campus.  An archaeologist will give a brief introduction. Admission is free, seating is limited, and the film is rated PG-13.

On Monday May 15, 6:00 to 8:00 pm, the public can take advantage of a rare opportunity to see artifacts from local archaeological excavations.  Repository Director, Barbara Frank, will open the SUU Archaeological Repository to the public.  The Repository is located in Room 101-A, west basement door, ELC, SUU campus. The tour is free and family-friendly.

Next, Saturday May 20, enjoy a free, guided tour of historic cabins in Kolob Canyon.  The tour will begin at Frontier Homestead State Park at 9 am and return by 1 pm. Sack lunches will be provided to all registered participants.  You must request a reservation and receive confirmation for this event, as space is limited.  Send request to samanthakirkley@suu.edu  This event is free, but not appropriate for all ages.

Come enjoy a special slide presentation by Shanandoah Anderson from the Southern Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah, Shivwits Band on Monday, May 22, at the Cedar City Public Library.  Ms. Anderson has taught at several reservation schools and enjoys sharing her cultural knowledge with others.  Don’t miss this unique and enlightening experience. This presentation is free to the public and appropriate for all family members.Archaeology Day 1 - pump drill (1)

The Hunter House Summer Kitchen

Once the interior of the Hunter House was complete, we turned our attention to the back. It has taken some time, but the back garden and summer kitchen is looking good and ready for action. Enjoy this look at a little of the work that went in to getting it to the pleasant area it is now.

The kitchen consists of an earth oven, a cast iron stove, a grilling area and food storage and preparation areas. There is still some work to be done with landscaping so keep checking back.

The summer kitchen will be available to rent starting this summer. It will be a great place for special events.

The Hunter House

Joseph Sneddon Hunter

Joseph Sneddon Hunter was born November 20, 1844 in Scotland to Joseph Hunter and Elizabeth Davidson. The family had joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1840 and in 1849 all seven immigrated to the United States. After pausing in Missouri where Elizabeth and two children died, Joseph Hunter and his sons set out for Utah, arriving in Salt Lake in the early fall of 1852. The Hunters were then called to help colonize Cedar City and arrived there in October.

Joseph Sneddon Hunter subsequently made his living in farming and livestock. In 1865 he married Elizabeth Catherine Pinnock, by whom he had ten children. Their house was built in three stages, between 1866 and 1891 with an addition in 1924. Hunter was active in church and civic affairs. He filled missions in the Southern States and in Washington County, held Church offices and gave the Church generous financial support. He believed strongly in the value of education which he supported financially and as a trustee. Joseph died in this house July 26, 1904.

Hunter House at the Homestead

The first section of the Hunter house, built in 1866, is a 1 – 1 ½ story brick example of the Central Hall vernacular type. Vernacular architecture is based on localized needs, uses local construction materials, and often reflects local traditions. The east facade displays the distinctive wall dormers which characterize much of Utah’s mid-19th century architecture. The 1866 section has gable-end chimneys and exhibits common brick bonding and relieving arched windows. Decorative features include a plain entablature, gable-end cornice returns, gable and dormer finials, and elliptical fan lights in the dormers. The mixing of Greek and Gothic Revival stylistic elements is commonly encountered on vernacular houses of this type.

Hunter House by Al Rounds

In 1891 the house received several additions in the “Victorian” stylistic tradition. A rear “T” extension was placed on the west side of the house. Unfortunately, this section proved too unstable to move. An elaborate porch was placed on the east façade of the main house at this time. This porch exhibits Eastlake design qualities in its intricately turned posts, scroll brackets, and spindled frieze. The richly articulated cutout designs between the posts are a particularly distinctive Eastlake feature.

Moving the Hunter House

In 2005 the Hunter House was relocated from its original address at 1st East and Center Street to Frontier Homestead State Park Museum.  The move and subsequent restoration of the historic 1866 portion is a testament to the communities desire to preserve and protect their heritage for all to experience and enjoy.

Meet our new Foundation Chair: Mike Scott

The Frontier Homestead Museum Foundation recently elected a new chair, Mike Scott. Maureen Carlson, one of our interpretive staff, recently sat down with him.

Mike Scott

Q – Tell me a little bit about yourself.

A – Well, let’s see, I am an engineer by trade. I had a company in Southern California, sold it, [then] moved to initially Parowan to help to raise and train horses. In California, my partner and I showed Clydesdales; we started with one and ended up with ten. I was looking for something to do, then I was invited to come to Utah and I’ve been here ever since, and that would’ve been in about 2002. So I’ve been in either Parowan or Cedar City since 2002.

Q – How have you liked it here?

A – I love it! We’re both retired and we’ve had discussions about ‘if we wanted to live anyplace in the nation, where would you go?’ and I said, ‘I love it here. We have four seasons.’ As a Southern California boy, I still oggle at the snow! And my partner, she’s from Minnesota and she’s going ‘Oh god, it’s snowing again…’ and I’m going ‘No, no! This is so cool!’

Q – What brought you here?

A – In Parowan here, initially it was Percherons, and maybe you remember the place, Mountain View Ranch? (Yes.) That’s who I worked for. That came about because Grant Cox used to show in Southern California and we were fellow competitors at horse shows. So then the opportunity came and he said, ‘Why don’t you come to Utah and work my horses?’ We disbanded our operation. It was a 24/7 job, you do not get a break at all. There’s only so many years of that you can take.

Q – What is it that is special to you about the Frontier Homestead?

A – Well I initially started as a volunteer and I came and saw that some of the harnesses on the horses were incorrect. So I asked if I could fix it. Then they steered me down to the wagon barn where there was extra leather, and I came up here and put some stuff together correctly as to how it should be. I just kind of paid attention to, you know, that’s the way we did it with horses and said, well if we’re showing it that way, then I gotta make it right, show it right.

Footings for the new storage building.

Q – What are you goals for the Foundation during your tenure?

A – Obviously number one is to finish the new building that’s been started out back near the Hunter House. The real plus about that is that it will enable us to obtain a couple more collections that people want to donate that we have no room for. There will probably be even three new collections that we’ll be able to house in that building. And also, it will give us the opportunity to move some of the carriages that are in the museum now out there for special events when we want to use the main building here in the museum, and that’s an intent in the future, is to be able to move things out so that we could have a big gala event here inside the museum. That’s one of the main intents of the building, additional collections and storage.

Q – How does the Foundation work with the park?

A – The Foundation actually has a Board of Trustees which I’m the chairman of and they are community members and some legislative members: Senator Vickers from Utah Legislature, Councilman Rowley from Cedar City, and we’re now looking to get an appointment from the Iron County Commission,(Councilman Mike Bleak has agreed to fill this position) plus interested volunteers. We just get together and come up with ideas for fundraisers or local support and once we raise money, decide how we’re going to spend it. And we kind of have a “hit list” of one, two, three, four of things we want to do and it’s well, what could we do immediately, what’s going to take a few years, what kind of money are we talking about, those kinds of things.

Q – How can people get more involved with the park?

A – We have a volunteer network and it’s basically just contacting the park. There’s a number of people that come into do volunteer work throughout the week, whether it be the lady weavers just kind of showing and they’re able to use the facility, and some fellows come in and help with restoration projects and/or other little special projects – carpentry kind of things and/or whatever. Just contact the museum, there’s a little form to fill out and become a volunteer helper.

Q – Is it spread mainly by word of mouth by people who work here or have volunteered here before?

A – Yeah, and Friends of the Museum group publishes a quarterly newsletter and seek volunteers through that. And then again through the printed press that we’re fortunate to be able to get from either the Spectrum or Iron County Today; we can get little blurbs in once in awhile in some of the articles that say, you know, if you’d like to come and help. And then the other word of mouth is, and I also coordinate Eagle Scout projects for here and we’ve had a number of them.

The Hay Derrick, an eagle scout project.

Q – I heard that the Hay Derrick out front here was an Eagle Scout project?

A – Correct. We talked about building one and the Eagle Scout that was actually in charge of it actually found one in Enoch and the land owner was gracious enough to donate it to us. So his group disassembled it and brought it to the park and put it back together, so he didn’t have to build one and the fellow that donated it got a little recognition. And you know, the front of the museum has changed significantly over the years, if you can remember, that it was just kind of grass and bushes and you never really knew that the building was here [because] it was kind of hidden. And now we have these large implements out front to draw attention to it.

Christmas at the Homestead

Q – What is your fondest memory of Frontier Homestead State Park?

A – Probably when we do Christmas at the Homestead that week in December. Every evening where we [have] singers, carolers, a couple of vendors, but it’s, you know, the hot chocolate and all the rest of the little goodies, little bonfires going everywhere, and it’s just kind of neat all around. It’s really a family event. It’s set up in such a way that you could come every night because there’s different singers, different musical groups.

 

Music at the Frontier Folk Festival

Q – Is that similar with the Folk Festival too, bringing in local artists?

A – They can come from Salt Lake or Las Vegas, some of the artists. The Folk Festival this year is basically local talent and music talent and artists pretty much local, maybe 75% local. And it’s not store goods, it’s handmade stuff and that was one of our requirements for our artists, that when they submit, we have to see pictures of them actually in their studios or their workplaces making whatever it is that they sell to show. There’s a tremendous amount of talent in this area.

If you are interested in joining the Frontier Homestead Foundation Friends group, you can learn more by clicking here.  Membership includes free admission to the park, including special events, discounts in the gift shop, and much more.

Book Review: Plain But Wholesome – Foodways of the Mormon Pioneers

Here at Frontier Homestead, we thought we would, from time to time, share with you what we are reading. This month our review comes from one of our interpreters, Amy Howe. We encourage you to share with us your favorite reads as the year progresses.

When faced with the question of what the pioneers ate most people immediately jump to sego lily bulbs and short rations of flour. In his book Plain but Wholesome Brock Cheney shows that, as with so many other things, it was the exceptional dietary experiences that are remembered rather than the typical.

Cheney looks at the traditions of food and food processes of the Mormon pioneers from the settling of Salt Lake City to 1869, when the transcontinental railroad reached Utah. He opens with an account of a party of Forty-niners passing through Salt Lake on July 24, 1849. They were astonished at the tables loaded with food and said they did not believe a greater variety could have been produced in that city. Even a year earlier at a harvest feast just thirteen months after arriving in the valley the menu included bread, beef, butter, cheese, cakes, pastry, sweet corn, melons and a variety of vegetables.

Pioneer treats

The book’s chapters deal with various aspects of food production, preservation, and preparation. Titles include: “Four Ounces of Flour: Food on the Trail”, “Berries, Bulbs, and Beasts: Wild Gathered Food,” and “Wetting the Whistle: Beverages Hot and Cold.” Throughout he shows how food was shaped by local availability, national origin, and religious sensibilities.

One interesting aspect is the inclusion of recipes. Some of these were handed down orally in families while others are taken from books of “receipts” published around the time looked at. When looking for the next family dinner item, consider Zwiebelcuchen, or traditional German onion cobbler.

The earth oven – one form of pioneer cookery.

These pioneer food traditions live on in some surprising ways. Hunting and fishing are the most obvious examples, but many families also head to the hills to carefully watched elderberry and chokecherry patches. The various community celebrations from Peach Days in the south to Onion Days in the north grew in part out of the pioneer’s harvest gatherings.

Plain but Wholesome offers an interesting and readable look at one aspect of a time in our history that is often overlooked. While there were difficult times when sego lilies and pigweed greens were the only food available, after a few years in a place food was of a surprising abundance and variety. The book can be enjoyed by local historians and food enthusiasts alike and makes a great gift, especially if you have friends who will reward you with food.

Sheep to Shawl

Soft as a pillow.

Frontier Homestead State Park invites you to our first big event of 2017. Join us Saturday, March 18 for a trip back in time as we explore wool, from Sheep to Shawl. Frontier Homestead State park in partnership with the Sagebrush Fiber Artisans will allow participants to journey through the step-by-step process of taking wool from the sheep’s back to yours. Join us from 10:00-2:00 to have fun with the whole family.

Sheep will be attending as well to give visitors the opportunity to touch and feel before and after their annual haircut. Shearing demonstrations will be given hourly starting and 10:30am and run until 1:30pm.

Spot before her haircut.

 

 

Spot during her haircut.

Dyeing wool

Demonstrations include shearing, washing, carding, spinning and dyeing wool. Knitting and weaving will be available to participate in. Come enjoy the activities and visit with our talented craftspeople. Cost is $2.00 per person or $5.00 per family. Friend’s Group members are free with membership card.

 

Spinners at the walking wheel

This living history experience is hosted at the Frontier Homestead State Park Museum located at 635 North Main Street in Cedar City. Call 435-586-9290 for more information.